Pioneering New Technology

Dig In: Vegas Farms, Indoor Fish Farms, & More

What's new and weird in food and farming? That's the question we gleefully ask ourselves at the outset of every edition of Dig In. As always, we've found some pretty wild answers.

Leave It To Botanists To Turn Cooking Into A Science Lesson — NPR

Turns out the best cooking involves a bit of chemistry. How do you change the pH of okra and make it less slimy? Why are kiwis green when ripe? Science gives us some pretty interesting — and useful — answers.

Drones Offer High-Tech Help to Japan's Aging Farmers — Reuters

Drones are taking some of the most backbreaking labor out of farming in Japan, which sounds pretty fantastic. Have they made drones that can assemble flat pack furniture yet?
If you’re going to have a drone photo, why not throw in a sunset too?

Las Vegas Has a New $30 Million Vertical Farm That Aims to Produce over 1 Million Pounds of Produce Every Year — Business Insider

What’s grown in Vegas…is grown vertically, apparently. These crops are grown indoors, year-round, without soil, which saves water and speeds up their growth. They’re already being sold and eaten in Vegas restaurants!
Up where they walk, up where they run...Wish I could be, in an indoor farm.

The Future of Fish Farming May Be Indoors — Scientific American

We are way, way past the level of fish tanks in dentists’ waiting rooms. Water filtration and circulation technology has advanced so far that indoor fish farms can be bigger than ever before.

Demystifying the Science Behind Biotechnology — Cornell Alliance for Science

OK, we know, a lot of polysyllabic words in that headline. (And sorry for “polysyllabic.”) But hang in there — this is a great breakdown of what it really means when we say that crops are genetically engineered.

What Food Waste Isn't OK to Eat? I Asked a Scientist — Vice

And so we return to the fundamental question of toddlers everywhere: Can I put that in my mouth? Click through for answers about apple cores, shrimp tails, and, in a real twist, watermelon rinds.
Will she feed him the rind too? Is that really a thing?!